How Should the FDA Regulate E-Cigarettes?

FDA-E-Cigarette-Standards-and-Nicotine-PolicyJune 19, 2014 marked the fifth anniversary of the landmark 2009 law (Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act) granting the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority over tobacco products.

The Coalition commends the FDA for the steps it has taken to reduce tobacco use and applauds the agency’s efforts to extend its regulatory authority over e-cigarettes and other tobacco products. It’s an important first step, but we believe the FDA can and should do more to regulate how and to whom e-cigarettes are marketed.

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New Media Campaign Targets the Chinese Community

(Left to Right): Lenny Cheng and Wai Yee Chen (CPC-Brooklyn), former NYC Council Member Sara Gonzalez, Edric Robinson (our BK team) and Eunice Huang (CPC-Brooklyn).

(Left to Right): Lenny Cheng and Wai Yee Chen (CPC-Brooklyn), former NYC Council Member Sara Gonzalez, Edric Robinson (our BK team) and Eunice Huang (CPC-Brooklyn).

While we’ve made great strides in reducing the overall smoking rate in New York City, smoking remains a big problem in Asian communities. A New York Times article pointed out that tobacco smoking is still a “way of life” in the heart of the City’s Asian communities.

A study published in Health Promotion Practice showed that high smoking rates in New York City’s Asian communities have persisted since 2012, especially among men. Smoking rates were particularly high (40.1%) among Chinese men living in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn.

To address this disparity, our Brooklyn team and their community partner, the Chinese American Planning Council–the Brooklyn Branch (CPC-Brooklyn) designed a public service ad campaign targeting Chinese (Mandarin)-speaking men to advocate for smoke-free housing in a culturally relevant and pertinent way.  We’re pleased to announce that the campaign will run in issues of Epoch Times, Sing Tao, and World Journal this week.

Chinese adAccording to the CPC-Brooklyn, a child’s future is the foremost priority for many Chinese parents. Therefore, in the campaign, we contrast two Chinese homes, each with different futures for the child.

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Smoking and the LGBT Community

Despite historic declines in smoking rates over the past ten years, there are still some people who smoke at disproportionately higher rates than the general population, including people who identify as LGBT.

June is LGBT Pride Month. The Coalition, the American Cancer Society and our community partners in the NYC LGBT Smoke-Free Initiative will join The March on Sunday, June 29. If you’d like to march with us, please let us know by registering here. We line up at 11am.

You can also visit our booth at PrideFest. We want to raise awareness among the LGBT community about their biggest health burden: smoking.

Please share this new infographic from LGBT Health Equity. It’s time for smoking to come out of the closet.

LGBT-smoking-infographic-Full-Size

 

A New Mural in Honor of World No Tobacco Day

705A picture is worth a thousand words.

That’s why students at the High School for Medical Professions in Canarsie, Brooklyn decided to show their friends and peers why they should kick the habit of smoking. On May 21, 2014, in honor of World No Tobacco Day, the students unveiled a mural showing the health effects of smoking that they had painted on their school’s cafeteria wall.

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World No Tobacco Day: The Real Price New Yorkers Pay for Tobacco Use

10376861_798497033495790_2746208451155712568_nTeens and health advocates denounced the tobacco industry for recruiting youth smokers and called for higher NYC tobacco prices at a press conference on Wednesday, May 28, 2014 in Times Square. Currently, 20,000 NYC public high school students smoke. One-third of them, approximately 6,600, will die prematurely from smoking. To represent the terrible cost tobacco imposes on New Yorkers’ lives, the Coalition unveiled an art installation: “6,600” spelled out with children’s shoes.

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Addiction Incorporated is Now Available

Addiction_Poster_FINAL_LmedIn December 2011, a group of our community partners joined us for a screening of the Charles Evans Jr.’s film, Addiction Incorporated. The film is now available on DVD for schools, universities, libraries and other educational institutions.

The film explains how former how former Philip Morris scientist Victor DeNoble’s unexpected discovery of an addiction ingredient in tobacco led to cigarettes that are even more addictive and how his Congressional testimony forever changed how tobacco is sold and marketed.


Anyone interested in public health and tobacco control will find this film engaging. Hard-hitting, suspenseful and eye-opening, Addiction Incorporated shows how Big Tobacco used its resources to intimidate scientists, the media, and public and elected officials to protect its profits.

Today, Big Tobacco spends $8.8 billion a year on tobacco marketing, much of it targeting youth. The current “Be Marlboro” campaign is just one example of the kind of aggressive and manipulative marketing the tobacco industry uses to encourage youth to smoke. Big Tobacco will stop at nothing to recruit youth as “replacement smokers” to ensure the economic future of their industry.

Addiction Incorporated reminds us that truth and sound science will always triumph over commerce and conspiracy.

NIH Announces NYC High School Student Wins Top Addiction Science Award with Study on Third Hand Nicotine from E-Cigarette Exposure

First place winner of 2014 Addiction Science Award (l-r): Judges and NIDA grantees Dr. Keith Heinzerling and Dr. Mitchell Wong, UCLA; winner Lily Wei Lee; Judge and NIDA grantee Dr. Bridget Freisthler, UCLA; and NIDA’s Dr. Sheri Grabus

First place winner of 2014 Addiction Science Award
(l-r): Judges and NIDA grantees Dr. Keith Heinzerling and Dr. Mitchell Wong, UCLA; winner Lily Wei Lee; Judge and NIDA grantee Dr. Bridget Freisthler, UCLA; and NIDA’s Dr. Sheri Grabus

Lily Wei Lee, a high school senior at Stuyvesant High School in New York City, won the top Addiction Science Award at the 2014 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the world’s largest science competition for high school students. The awards are coordinated by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, and Friends of NIDA, a coalition that supports NIDA’s mission.

Her award-winning project, The Assessment of Third Hand Exposure to Nicotine from Electronic Cigarettes, showed that nicotine residue from e-cigarette vapor does in fact stick to surfaces long after e-cigarette users are gone. The amount of residual nicotine depended on the brand used.

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